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Niger: the Sanofi Espoir Foundation provides assistance in primary health care in the Tillabéri region

April 17, 2019

As part of its response to humanitarian emergencies, the Sanofi Espoir Foundation announces that it is involved in Niger alongside its partner Première Urgence Internationale (PUI). The Foundation will provide primary health care assistance in the Tillabéri region in the west of the country. This six-month commitment will restore access to health care for populations affected by insecurity, and strengthen local health capacity in the Ouallam health district.

Weakened by the regional crisis in the Lake Chad Basin and by the numerous displacements of refugees and migrants who cross its territory, Niger is directly impacted by the Malian crisis and the ongoing conflict on the border territory of the Tillabéri and Tahoua regions. In March 2017, a state of emergency was declared in five departments of the Tillabéri region, including Ouallam, and there has been a significant increase in population movements in the region. In an area that is already vulnerable due to structural problems, difficulties in accessing public services, and epidemic risks, the region is now seeing its primary health care coverage decline on a daily basis.

Niger: the Sanofi Espoir Foundation provides assistance in primary health care in the Tillabéri region
Crédit photos : PUI

The assistance provided will include in particular:

  • A diagnosis of existing monitoring systems (health, epidemiological, and contextual)
  • Strengthening alerts through community agents
  • Continuous training of the agents of integrated health centres
  • Setting up a mobile clinic to access populations in a state of emergency
  • Systematic screening for malnutrition in children under 5 years of age

The Sanofi Espoir Foundation will provide financial support, in addition to a programme already funded by the Crisis and Support Centre of the French Ministry of Europe and Foreign Affairs. Its support is expected to benefit approximately 13,000 people.